Diamond E Analysis Essay

Diamond E Analysis Essay-89
But an entire film about a robot was unconventional, even for Pixar, so the concept was stored away at the time, considered too risky for a studio that had not yet debuted its first computer-animated feature.Not until long after Pixar had established itself would the writer-director return to the idea of an isolated robot left on Earth.In 2004, Stanton should have been on vacation after his long production on ; instead, under the radar, he developed the first twenty minutes of the picture with just a few storyboard artists and an editor on his team.

But an entire film about a robot was unconventional, even for Pixar, so the concept was stored away at the time, considered too risky for a studio that had not yet debuted its first computer-animated feature.Not until long after Pixar had established itself would the writer-director return to the idea of an isolated robot left on Earth.In 2004, Stanton should have been on vacation after his long production on ; instead, under the radar, he developed the first twenty minutes of the picture with just a few storyboard artists and an editor on his team.

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More than any other Pixar release, it puts forth animation not as a genre unto itself, but as a medium in which the possibilities are limitless.

One of the first animators hired by Pixar in the late 1980s, Stanton played a creative role in their first feature, .

Alongside John Lasseter (Pixar’s CEO), Joe Ranft (head of Pixar’s story department), and Pete Docter (one of Pixar’s future directors), Stanton helped conceive ideas for future film concepts such as .

During the discussion, Stanton asked, “What if mankind had to leave Earth and somebody forgot to turn off the last robot?

The first moments of the screenplay evoke as much: “Stars. Stanton’s other major influence was expanding upon the look of Luxo Jr., the bouncing lamp who appears on Pixar’s animated logo.

The upbeat show tune, Put On Your Sunday Clothes, plays. But, rather than imbue WALL•E with easily recognizable, personified features, Stanton sought to create a functional robot first, and then work within the design’s limitations to project human qualities.

He pondered how to establish the robot’s situation with elegant animation, emphasizing physical behavior over words.

Fortunately, ’s massive performance at the worldwide box-office afforded Stanton leverage to explore his ideas with Pixar and the distributors at Disney.

Rather than write in WALL•E’s beeps and tones, Stanton wrote dialogue for what each of those beeps meant to convey. Stanton implemented an expressive character design, but when early images of WALL•E first appeared, detractors noted similarities between the film’s titular robot and Number 5 from (1982).

Legendary sound designer Ben Burtt, responsible for R2D2’s sounds and other countless iconic noises from (1979) as a model for how to encapsulate visually complicated, thematically dense, and overall loaded scenes to minimalist, almost poetic effect. However, Stanton insisted any inspiration from those films remains “unconscious”, and the true inspiration for WALL•E’s look comes from binoculars: “You don’t need a mouth, you don’t need a nose, you get a whole personality just from [them].” The adage about eyes being the window to the soul comes to mind.

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