Advanced Academic Writing

Advanced Academic Writing-85
For example, exclamation points are rarely used to express a heightened tone because it can come across as unsophisticated or over-excited.Dashes should be limited to the insertion of an explanatory comment in a sentence, while hyphens should be limited to connecting prefixes to words [e.g., multi-disciplinary] or when forming compound phrases [e.g., commander-in-chief].

Therefore, it is important that you use unambiguous language.

Well-structured paragraphs and clear topic sentences enable a reader to follow your line of thinking without difficulty.

Note that a problem statement without the research questions does not qualify as academic writing because simply identifying the research problem does not establish for the reader how you will contribute to solving the problem, what aspects you believe are most critical, or suggest a method for gathering data to better understand the problem. Complexity and Higher-Order Thinking Academic writing addresses complex issues that require higher-order thinking skills applied to understanding the research problem [e.g., critical, reflective, logical, and creative thinking as opposed to, for example, descriptive or prescriptive thinking].

Higher-order thinking skills include cognitive processes that are used to comprehend, solve problems, and express concepts or that describe abstract ideas that cannot be easily acted out, pointed to, or shown with images.

In academic writing, the author is expected to investigate the research problem from an authoritative point of view.

You should, therefore, state the strengths of your arguments confidently, using language that is neutral, not confrontational or dismissive. Diction Diction refers to the choice of words you use.

The challenge is to convince the reader of the validity of your opinion through a well-documented, coherent, and logically structured piece of writing.

This is particularly important when proposing solutions to problems or delineating recommended courses of action. Thesis-Driven Academic writing is “thesis-driven,” meaning that the starting point is a particular perspective, idea, or position applied to the chosen topic of investigation, such as, establishing, proving, or disproving solutions to the research questions posed for the topic.

However, what is valued in academic writing is that opinions are based on what is often termed, evidence-based reasoning, a sound understanding of the pertinent body of knowledge and academic debates that exist within, and often external to, your discipline.

You need to support your opinion with evidence from scholarly sources.

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